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White Paper: ENERGY STAR* Version 5.0 System Implementation

White Paper: ENERGY STAR* Version 5.0 System Implementation

Introduction

Over the last twenty-five years, computers have become pervasively used tools that have enhanced the productivity in the office and enhanced entertainment and utility within the home. Their remarkable growth has been fueled by amazing advancements in performance, capability, and affordability. As the number of computers has grown, so has the need for delivery and deployment in increasingly energy conscious ways. More energy friendly computers can have an effect on both the available energy capacity as well as on the ecological impacts of generating additional electricity to meet growing demands.

Moving forward, there will continue to be a need for greater levels of computer performance and capability that will also be coupled with the need to manage energy consumption. Intuitively, it would seem that delivering greater performance/capability would be at odds with managing energy consumption. However, innovations by Intel and others in the industry have enabled delivery of technologies that can help offset and, in some cases, even reduce the energy consumed by the computer. These innovations have typically focused on optimizing the energy efficiency and performance when the computer is actively being used while minimizing the actual energy consumption when the computer is in a state of prolonged inactivity.

Today’s computers, such as desktops and notebooks, have many power saving capabilities built into them. Examples are the “sleep” and “hibernate” modes that can significantly reduce the amount of energy consumed during inactive states. When these capabilities are turned on during periods of inactivity, it has been estimated to reduce the overall amount of energy consumed by computers by up to 50%.

Read the full ENERGY STAR* Version 5.0 System Implementation White Paper.

White Paper: ENERGY STAR* Version 5.0 System Implementation

Introduction

Over the last twenty-five years, computers have become pervasively used tools that have enhanced the productivity in the office and enhanced entertainment and utility within the home. Their remarkable growth has been fueled by amazing advancements in performance, capability, and affordability. As the number of computers has grown, so has the need for delivery and deployment in increasingly energy conscious ways. More energy friendly computers can have an effect on both the available energy capacity as well as on the ecological impacts of generating additional electricity to meet growing demands.

Moving forward, there will continue to be a need for greater levels of computer performance and capability that will also be coupled with the need to manage energy consumption. Intuitively, it would seem that delivering greater performance/capability would be at odds with managing energy consumption. However, innovations by Intel and others in the industry have enabled delivery of technologies that can help offset and, in some cases, even reduce the energy consumed by the computer. These innovations have typically focused on optimizing the energy efficiency and performance when the computer is actively being used while minimizing the actual energy consumption when the computer is in a state of prolonged inactivity.

Today’s computers, such as desktops and notebooks, have many power saving capabilities built into them. Examples are the “sleep” and “hibernate” modes that can significantly reduce the amount of energy consumed during inactive states. When these capabilities are turned on during periods of inactivity, it has been estimated to reduce the overall amount of energy consumed by computers by up to 50%.

Read the full ENERGY STAR* Version 5.0 System Implementation White Paper.

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